Garden birdhouse wreath with silvery birds

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For the birds, but pretty, too…

Jeanne Rhodes cleverly designed this cute birdhouse wreath for Fall and hung it on a tree in her garden.  She says, “I made these aluminum pie plate birds from Stephie McCarthy’s pattern several years ago. I love to put them near birdhouses…”

Jeannie Rhodes‎'s birdhouse wreath

Birdhouses and wreaths make excellent companions.  The birdhouse can be hung inside the wreath like the one Loonie Franz put together (at bottom) or the wreath can actually hang from the birdhouse attached to a post or tree.

When you pretty them up like Jeannie does, it adds the Flea Market gardening touch!

Here's another birdhouse with the two more birds, Jeannie says

“Here’s another birdhouse with the two of the aluminum birds… I saw a birdhouse surrounded by a grapevine wreath somewhere here and liked the look.”

Jeannie Rhodes's idea is simple and elegant with Stephie's birds

Jeannie used a very durable twig wreath for outdoors and two others here are made with even sturdier rounds of barbed wire.
On her website, Stephie McCarthy tells how to make Pie-pan birds…

Stephie’s Pie Pan Birds

“Sparkling pie-pan birds dance in the wind, scaring away deer and other thieves from a country garden.”

Stephie's pie-pan birds

Stephie explains it all, “Cut pie-pans into fanciful shapes like butterflies, or flowers, or use my flying bird pattern below. Cut out pattern, and trace around it onto the back of a pie-pan with a laundry marker. Use a sturdy pair of shears to cut inside the traced lines. Punch a hole along the top edge with a nail or awl. We used glittering tinsel string to tie them to a trellis, but you can use recycled string, wire, or raffia … download my free Flying Swallow Pattern here.”

Or, just click the pattern below for a printable pattern.

Stephie's pie pan bird pattern

Stephie is artist for Flea market gardening and if you haven’t visited her website, Stephie McCarthy’s Journal, you will be surprised and delighted!

ParaBreak2 stephie

 

Two more bird house and wreath combos

Loonie Franz's bird house wreath from sturdy barbed wire

Loonie Franz’s bird house wreath from sturdy barbed wire

 

Dean Jacobs McCall's birdhouse

Dean Jacobs McCall says, “Old fence was recycled in the back yard a few years ago and the birdhouse wreath added…”

Nancy Carter's unique encircled birdhouse

Nancy Carter’s unique encircled birdhouse

More on unique Flea Market birdhouses:

Make a Flea Market bird house post

Kirk’s bird house trellis

Annie’s bird house ladder

Easy flea-market style: bird houses, feeders, and crafts

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Kathy’s Gorgeous Greenhouse From Old Windows

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A Fantastical Flea Market Green house

Kathy Gilbert lives in Louisiana, owns a business called Nature’s Hideaway Nursery and Gardens. She loves junking and gardening and her business is where she expresses this passion! She says, “My greenhouse it is my favorite project so far… it has been a real blessing for me.”
Now we get to see how it came to be!

The framework rises

The framework rises and we imagine Kathy was above the moon with excitement!

How the Greenhouse was built

Kathy says, “Being a junker and lover of old vintage treasures, I could not imagine a regular greenhouse.  it had to fit with the atmosphere of my business, which Is a garden center designed around crusty rusty vintage finds.

Every window was well-placed

Every window was well-placed

“I had a employee who was wonderful about taking my ideas and making them work and though it’s not perfect by any means, I just love the way it turned out!  Every time he needed a window or a piece of decorative iron work or stained glass, I would pull it out of my collections and he would make it fit.”

 

This is the back

The front and back were sheathed in salvaged corrugated roofing.

 

 

An archway entrance is designed for the front

An archway entrance is designed for the front

 

Entrance to the greenhouse

Entrance to the back of the greenhouse

 

Kathy's 'industrial chic' begins to collect around the greenhouse

Kathy’s ‘industrial chic’ begins to collect around the greenhouse

 

The archway entrance becomes draped with airy vines over time

The archway entrance becomes draped with airy vines over time

Kathy tells us, “The greenhouse was built in 2009 and since then it is used every fall for our Fall festival, Autumn Joys in the Garden.  We fill it with scarecrows and pumpkins and mums, and in late winter we use it to start all our little plants for spring.  In the spring it is filled with all those wonderful plants for our spring show Spring Time in the Garden.”

 

Junktiques and salvage

Junktiques and salvage

 

Welcome to the greenhouse

Welcome to the greenhouse…it’s Spring!

 

The greenhouse ready for an event, can you imagine a wedding here?

The greenhouse ready for an event, can you imagine a wedding here?

 

Autumn Joys in the Garden, Kathy's Fall event

Autumn Joys in the Garden, Kathy’s Fall event

 

Cool season pretties

Cool season pretties ready to go into a Fall garden

 

You wanted to see inside, right?

You wanted to see inside, right?

 

Spring Time in the Garden

Spring Time in the Garden

 

So many ways to decorate in just our style

So many ways to decorate in just our style

Natures Hideaway Nursery & Gardens is a wonderful place to shop for plants, ironwork and clay pots. They also have a shop full of antique, vintage and new items for the home and garden. Kathy describes her style as industrial cottage chic.

“I have been in the plant nursery business going on twelve years and have been junking in some fashion for more years than I can remember!”       Blessings, Kathy

 

Emma Katherine

Emma Katherine

The youngest of Kathy’s two grandchildren Emma Katherine.  Future gardener?  I bet!

Come back again!

Come back again!

Natures Hideaway Nursery & Gardens
5032 Naff Ave, Bastrop, Louisiana

www.kathysnatureshideaway.blogspot.com

Vine

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Billie’s pops of red in the garden

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Wow Them with Red!

It’s said that every room in your home needs a bit of red.  We think this applies to the garden as well!

Billie Hayman has compared her garden to a canvas upon which she ‘paints.’   Whether with flowers or Flea market finds, we noticed recently one color she likes to use often, … red!   Billie, from Greensburg, Louisiana, says she loves all bright colors, and red and yellow are her favorites.  She’s a pretty good photographer in her garden and very busy….she has a talent for composing garden vignettes, this time, with pops of red!

Billie's 'reddish' mailbox

Billie says, “I had to show you what I did with this rusty mailbox! When I painted it red, it was so rusty it was dark underneath and turned out perfectly two-toned!”

Discover the ways Billie used red, both alone and in combination with other colors. You’ll see the most effective framing color for a red-flowered standout is its complement: green. When a flower or shrub border focuses on green foliage, red flowers or red leaves truly shine.

Red Rose GardenBillie’s pinky-red hedge of Knock-Out roses truly knock you out!   When a flower or shrub border focuses on green foliage, red flowers or red leaves truly shines.

 

Billie's fairy wheelbarrow garden“My wheelbarrow garden..”

Red and rust

Billie's red and rustFor my Flea Market Gardening friends…I know how we all love rust!!

 

Billie's Christmas HouseRed is the color Billie chose for her garden shed she calls her Christmas House.

 

A line of watering cansWatering cans line up! My bed springs will have morning glories growing up in this year.

Tips for Using Red Flowers in the garden

  • Red tends to dominate a scene. Use it sparingly for best results.
  • In Spring, red brightens the entire garden and in Summer afternoons, the red just glows having a warming effect.
  • Red flowers attract hummingbirds!
  • Add red accents, such as linens and candles, for a layered effect in your garden.

 

Fairy garden in a crateA friend of mine gave me a couple of empty crates to do something with. I made a fairy garden!

 

Billie Hayman's red milk canBillie Hayman’s faded red milk can tucked in between the  hydrangea plants echoes the color of her shed.

Painting in the garden

Whether you use spray paint, interior or exterior paint, they all chip and fade after a few years. It’s called a patina and happens very quickly out in the elements.  That’s a look that many of us like very much and also the reason why we’re always looking to replace wood items we paint and ‘oopsie’ paint from the hardware store.  We can all tell here which of Billie’s garden accents are newly painted and those which she painted a few years ago like this milk can above.  Lovely!

Billie's basket of orangey-redBillie’s basket of orangey-red geraniums, she says, have lived in this basket for two years

 

Billie's flower bed“This is my ‘work in progress’ flower “bed.” Billie says.  It was my baby sister’s bed and in honor of her I’m planting a Black-eyed Susies!  I painted it red, her favorite color, with a yellow flower to match.”

 

Billie Hayman‎ long-lasting geraniums“One of my favorite flower buckets, filled with Pentas. I did the stencil myself.”

 This chandelier was an awful tan color, but it was inexpensive, so I bought it and spray painted it red!Billie says, “This chandelier was an awful tan color, but it was inexpensive,
so I bought it and spray painted it red!”

Moss roses

Billie says, “When the sun hits this plant in the morning it is so awesome… it’s a moss rose and what’s great is they come up on their own! I had these in a hanging basket to the side of my knock out roses in the front of my house, that’s when I started seeing them come up all between my roses from the wind blowing the seed. They transplant so easy,… just water them right after.”

 Billie Hayman's zinniasZinnias glow in afternoon light

Best Red Flowers for Your Garden

  • Red knock-out roses
  • Geraniums
  • Moss roses
  • ‘Mr Lincoln’ rose
  • Zinnias
  • Shirley Poppies
  • Dianthus
  • Pentas
  • Verbena
  • Bee Balm

*Don’t forget red berries, twigs, fall leaves and bark which, in the winter garden, show off so well against a wintry or snowy background.

 

This little baby is still blooming beautifully for the holidaysThis little baby is still blooming beautifully for the holidays

Billie HaymanBillie, the garden ‘painter’

More about Billie

Billie’s rustic and romantic country garden

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Light fixture magic in the garden

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Clever Light Fixture ideas you can do…

Shopping at thrift shops is loads of fun when you spot lighting finds like these.  These and other lamps and lanterns are the beginnings of brilliant recycled lights for the garden.  Some make use of collections and are portable and we’ll show you how to do it all.

Cindy Sullivan collected a few lamp parts and then found this treasure, the golden globe of a 19602 style table lamp.  She adding a string of lights and used the parts to create the top.

Cindy Sullivan's 60s lamp gets a new life

Cindy Sullivan’s 60s lamp gets a new life

Cindy says, ”We re-purpose lights and globes all the time to create unique fixtures. We found this amazing base, took a finial from another light and filled the globe with Christmas white lights…voila!”

Lantern chandelier was designed with an old mining theme

Lantern chandelier was designed with an old mining theme

Nine old mining lanterns were used in this hanging light fixture found at a cabin in Shaver Lake, California. This part of the state has a rich mining history, so the homeowners used their amazing collection of lanterns, set them on a 12x 30″  rusty grate and hid the wiring underneath.  Four huge bolt hold the chains on each corner. This is great for indoors or out.  The colors of the lanterns are the best thing about this rustic chandelier.

Now for a simpler project…

Nancy Carter ‎sparkled up her porch light with glass gems

Nancy Carter ‎sparkled up her porch light with glass gems

Nancy Carter‎ says, “This light was made with a wall hung light fixture, glass gems and battery timer string lights.” Simple!

 

Carol Dial used lamp parts and a stake to make her garden accent

Carol Dial used lamp parts and a stake to make her garden accent

Carol Dial tells us “My Dear created this for me from our hanging lamp. He is looking for a solar to make it light at night. I am enjoying it just the way it is.”

 

Raw materials

Look for these globe lights, easily found at thrift shops

Look for these globe lights, easily found at thrift shops

If you find it hard to find these discarded globe lights, it’s because Flea Market Gardeners around the country have been snapping them up!  Luckily they are plentiful and so versatile  for use in the garden.  Here are some easy ways to use them!

Popping the top of a solar cell on each globe and hanging them in a tree is one special way to display them.

Jeanne Sammons's light in the pines

Jeanne Sammons’s light in the ‘pines’

Jeanne Sammons explains,“My globe solar light is hung in the tamarack tree just out from the porch garden where we can see it in Winter and where the birds enjoy a feeder and waterer. We recycled an amber ceiling fan light globe, added top of a solar stake light, painting the edges with a black permanent marker, some old black chain and ta-da … globe lights!”

At night the sparkle is amazing, when the solar cells light

When the solar cells light at night, the sparkle on Marie’s hanging lights is amazing!

 

How to attach the chain and ring

How to attach the chain and ring

Hanging Globe Light How To

Marie Niemann shows how to attach the chain. You need slender metal chain, a 1inch metal ring, one solar light and needle nosed pliers, that’s all!

  1.  First cut a chain to fit tightly around the lip of the globe and join it with needle nosed pliers.
  2.  Then cut three long chains and attach them to this circle at evenly spaced intervals.
  3.  At the top, attach the three long chains to a metal ring to create a hanger.
  4. Remove the stake from the solar light and simply pop it on top!
Marie Nieman's 'collector' lamp shade,...a prize!

Marie Nieman’s ‘collector’ lamp shade,…a prize!

 

Carrol Dahl made stakes from recycled ceiling fan lights

Carrol Dahl made stakes from recycled ceiling fan lights

Discarded chandelier and fan lights or bathroom vanity light shades can also be used in the garden. Carrol Dahl says, “I found these discarded hanging lights at a second hand store and my husband removed all of the wires and welded on some supports to stand. I love the way they match our shutters.”

 

Three chandelier ideas…

Billie Hayman added bright color‎ for immediate attention grabbing!

Billie Hayman added bright color‎ for immediate attention grabbing!

Billie Hayman chose a favorite bold color to brighten up a drab recycled chandelier. The spray paint brings out all the frilly detail.

 

Lisa Burns's teacup chandelier‎

Lisa Burns’s teacup chandelier‎

Lisa Burns‎ tells us,“My chandelier is an old solar light turned upside down with added teapot and teacups to create a birdfeeder planter.”

Theresa Jones ‎added black solar lights to a simple chandelier

Theresa Jones ‎added black solar lights to a simple chandelier

Theresa Jones‎ says, “My solar chandelier at dusk. Another project idea I got from your page! Was an ugly gold from Habitat Restore, painted to match gazebo and glued on $1 solar lights.”

Going vertical…

Like blue? Nancy K. Meyer does, too!

Like blue? Nancy does, too!

Nancy K. Meyer found this simple iron fixture and added her signature touch.  She says, “My new chandelier, all blinged up.”

Have an old pole lamp?  Becky Norris says, “I made this planter out of an old stand lamp by upturning the metal shade and adding a glass globe upside down to hold my former hanging basket. I added some vinyl stars to the shade to help it blend into my red, white and blue area of my garden.”

Becky Norris's topsy turvy pole lamp

Becky Norris’s topsy turvy pole lamp

ParaBreak2 stephie

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Create a garden background for your Flea Market finds

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Vignettes 101

A garden background has traditionally been a high border of shrubbery or a hedge of some kind. When you use antique and flea market finds in the garden, they show off better with some kind of backdrop to create some focus.

Nancy Lachance's surprising back ground

Nancy Lachance’s surprising back ground

Nancy Lachance says, “ I thought the colors looked good together.  My neighbor was doing some work and left it there for a few hours. I had to snap a picture. The colors and light had such a good feeling to it!”  We think it should stay here…

Why start with a background?

A background stops your eye and lets the garden art in front be the star. Color, shape and texture of a background piece can make a huge difference. Assembling items in front of a backdrop can anchor them and reduce the feeling of clutter.  All these elements go into creating an appealing garden vignette you’ll love.

 

Henry Whitehurst's woodsy retreat

Henry Whitehurst’s woodsy retreat

Henry Whitehurst tells us, “We have a front door to our Woodland Garden that we painted a warm green to blend with the surroundings.”

 

Christy Thomas wire gate acts as a frame for her bottle 'vases'

Christy Thomas wire gate acts as a frame for her bottle ‘vases’

Christy Thomas says, ‘Old bottles hold posies. There are several of these various gates on the garage wall.”

Cheryl Onken's shed is the background for her garden surrounding it

Cheryl Onken’s shed is the background for her garden surrounding it

Cheryl Onken shares her garden shed that she says, “we designed & built and now surround with all the priceless “finds” that make it look so welcoming.”

Carol Winger Hall's quaint fence section

Carol Winger Hall’s quaint fence section

 

Tammy Prouty's rustic garden picket fence

Tammy Prouty’s rustic garden picket fence

 

Jeanne Sammons's display wouldn't be the same without the window behind

Jeanne Sammons’s display wouldn’t be the same without the window behind

 

Catharine Robertson-Lepage's wagonwheel

Catharine Robertson-Lepage’s wagon wheel

 

Jeanne Sammons's dutch door is an ideal rustic background

Jeanne Sammons’s dutch door is an ideal rustic background

Jeanne Sammons tells us, “Here’s an old barn wood door that we rescued … I painted it white, added a board frame & grapevine wreath, an old freezer basket, a branch of Curly Willow & took it to daughter’s house with Fall Mums… barn wood is fun to recycle!”

 

Karen's Treasures wonderful simple door

Karen’s Treasures wonderful simple door

Tanya Goldsmith's tree makes a simple 'backdrop' for her flea market treasures

Tanya Goldsmith’s tree makes a simple ‘backdrop’ for her flea market treasures

 

Brigid Williams laundry day vignette also makes use of a tree backdrop

Brigid Williams laundry day vignette also makes use of a tree backdrop

 

Backgrounds to look for:

  • Doors, painted or natural
  • Weathered fence pieces
  • Vintage wagon wheels
  • Iron or galvanized gates
  • Wood or split rail fences
  • Shutters
  • A big tree
  • Weathered lattice
  • Rustic window
  • Baker’s rack
  • Pallet
  • Mattress springs
  • Bed frames or head boards

Also take advantage of wonderful old brick, stone and weathered wood house walls.  For more ideas, see the Vignettes album on our Facebook page.

George Weaver treasure gate

George Weaver treasure gate

 

Jerri Clark's back drop of door and pallets creates a focal point

Jerri Clark’s back drop of door and pallets creates a focal point

 

Louretta Pugh's quaint shed is a showcase

Louretta Pugh’s quaint shed is a showcase

 

Olivia Parazine's cottage garden rose

Olivia Parazine’s cottage garden rose

Olivia Parazine’s little back porch acts as a creamy white background, with, she says, “my climbing rose bloomin!  I use the Bayer rose and flower care around the soil base. They get plenty of sunshine and water too! I am thinking it may be nice to mix a lighter pink in on the other side….”

 

Christy Morrow's cottage makes a cute place to arrange a collection of Flea market finds.

Christy Morrow’s cottage makes a cute place to arrange a collection of Flea market finds

 

Kirk Willis rustic vignette makes use of some natural rock at the back of his garden

Kirk Willis rustic vignette makes use of some natural rock at the back of his garden

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