Tool box planters

Creative containers: Vintage toolbox planters!

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How to plant a recycled toolbox for the garden

Almost anything can be repurposed for a unique container.  One of the most charming Flea Market gardening-style containers is an old toolbox, either metal or wood.  Here are two How To planting projects using a metal and wooden toolboxes and a gallery of our best examples.

Planting a wooden toolbox

Toolboxes are always on my mental shopping list.   You can simply drill a few holes in the bottoms for drainage and there’s no need to worry about the metal ones breaking down too fast out in the elements. Wooden toolboxes can be lined with plastic or rubber liners to make the wood last as long as possible.

The day's lucky junk shop finds, including the wooden farrier's toolbox and files

The day’s lucky junk shop finds, including the wooden farrier’s toolbox and files

The first toolbox I found was a farriers wooden toolbox with a heavy metal handle. The junk shop proprietor sold me the box and all the files,…35 of them for $10!  I drilled some drainage holes and lined the box with a heavy black plastic trash bag, secured with metal staples. Now I was ready to plant!

Farrier's toolbox into planter and a file edging

Farrier’s toolbox into planter and a file edging

I plaanted some ‘Blueberry Thrill’ violas and alyssum and placed the box on a low shelf under the front bay window.  The shelf itself acts as a display space along with my birdhouse collection, and now the toolbox will act as a window box,…with a file fence!  I love it!

Planting a metal tool box

At a recent yard sale, I found this huge galvanized toolbox and thought it was perfect for a large planter, which otherwise would be pretty expensive.  I was looking for a planter that would fit at the corner of the garage. I wanted it to liven up the area and provide a little color for Tractor Man as he putters around out on the driveway doing whatever he does. The price of $40 was just right!

Found this huge toolbox for $40.

Found this huge toolbox for $40.

Soon, Tractor Man’ll have a nice garden here to enjoy as he works. I drilled 10 or 12 holes in the bottom for drainage and tossed in 6 sealed empty Folger’s cans.  (I use these to collect kitchen scraps and I threw those in, too!  A tractor scoop of dirt and a big bag of soil went it next.

I displaced some soil with the Folger's cans I save

I displaced some soil with empty Folger’s coffee cans I save tossed in the bottom

 

The toolbox all planted!  I added a dripper for reliable watering

The toolbox all planted! I added a dripper for reliable watering

I planted a French lavender a Poker plant and two Black-eyed Susans.  Two little daises went in front.

A few weeks later:

Toolbox planter jazzes up this corner!

Toolbox planter jazzes up this corner!

 

Tractor Man's  tool box planter in July

Tractor Man’s tool box planter in July. He likes it! He especially likes the signs displayed on the lid

Will Tractor man like his new garden?  He does!  He says this is now his favorite flower and this makes a fantastic bright spot as we pull into the drive.  Yea!

 

Garden Toolbox Idea file

Kirk Willis's vibrantly planted wooden toolbox, with red geraniums

Kirk Willis says, “My old toolbox, planted with bright red Geraniums.

 

Kirk Willis‎ gazania toolbox

Kirk Willis‎ gazania toolbox

 Kirk found another old, $1 toolbox, garage sale find from last weekend. I planted it up with Gazania plants.”

 

Shelley Novotny, of JunkArta, shows us some impatiens in a vintage metal toolbox with wire ribbon

Shelley Novotny, of JunkArta, shows us some impatiens in a vintage metal toolbox with clever chicken wire ribbon

 

Nancy Pedersen's antique toolbox, filled with hens and chicks

Nancy Pedersen’s antique toolbox with a rope handle, filled with hens and chicks

Nancy Pedersen tells us,”Here is an old wooden tool box that I had been storing in the attic. I decided to stuff it full of Echeveria, Crassula, and a sedum variety. I can’t wait until it fills in!  The gray ones are Echeveria variety and the red is Crassula, and the limey green is a sedum variety.  The succulents were relocated from an old home that got torn down and they had probably been planted in the 60′s. There are so many prettier varieties available today – I just had these on hand.”

Jeanne Sammons's handcrafted toolboxes

Jeanne Sammons’s handcrafted toolboxes

I’m thinking maybe Jeanne Sammons saw Nancy’s toolbox!  She says, “My hubby and I made these together.  I usually come up with an idea and he makes it happen…these turned out really cute I thought for Hens and Chicks!

Tip

No worries about the metal heating up and damaging your plants.  We have proved with real gardeners that the metal just doesn’t heat up very much when it’s as thin as it is. The same goes for thicker walled galvanized containers!

Julia Tomasic uses an old castoff tool box full of mason jars

Julia Tomasic uses an old castoff tool box full of mason jars.  This blue is lovely!

 

Audra DeGulis's charming toolboxes

Audra DeGulis’s charming toolboxes set along a block wall

 

Joyce Collins found this tool box

Not just for planting…Joyce Collins’s tool box holds….tools!

Joyce Collins found this tool box and the vintage garden tools, too.  She normally resells her junkola, but says she will probably have to keep this one. This would be a simple wooden box to make, too!

 

Fishtail Cottage's quaint little flower box

Fishtail Cottage’s quaint little flower box is just the right color for these pink lavender plants


Bettye Watkins's clever 'handle'

Bettye Watkins’s clever ‘handle’

Bettye Watkins makes old reclaimed wood and art items. She says, “I made this and thought it would make a great utensil caddy for the garden or container for 3 small pots with plants. I wouldn’t want to place dirt in it for a permanent plant without lining it with plastic. The wood might not hold up long otherwise.”

 

Not just for planting, Kathy Hardin's toolbox

Kathy Hardin bought this old tool box and also uses it to hold her garden and household tools “KEEP OUT!” she says


Carol Hall's toolbox vignette

Carol Hall’s toolbox vignette

Carol Hall says,”This box with the hens and chicks was my husband’s. The tools were all found in my garage and some were left from the previous owners. The galvanized bucket was a yard sale find. Notice the redneck birdbath. I got that idea on an outing.”

 More about using tools as decor in the garden:

Rakes     9 uses for a rusty old rake in the garden
Ladders   Old ladders reach new heights in the garden
Wheelbarrows   How to plant a rusty wheelbarrow for the garden
Farm implements   Adding antique rust from the farm to your garden
Watering cansVintage watering cans in the garden
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Patti's tin lady

Patti’s fantastical ‘tin can’ garden lady

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…plus a tin man you can easily make! How to included…

How to make a ‘Tin Can’ lady and more!

Here at Flea Market Gardening, we adore the funky and foolish, so when Patti gathered her collection of various tin cans, some rusty wire  and bottle caps, we were happy to see this tin can lady that appeared!

Patti's painted tin lady and man

Patti’s painted tin lady and man

This is a recycle project that can bring life to your garden and make you feel great about saving items from the landfill.  Patti started out with a big project, then years later improved it to the point of amazing whimsy!

Patti Clarke from Sun Valley, Nevada made this ‘Tin Lady,’ and for a few years she was unpainted and rusting away.  Recently, she decided to jazz them up with paint, proving  that she has an innate ability and talent for picking colors.   She soon added a mate for her lady and the ‘chromium couple’ even have pets…. tin dogs, of course!

 

Which one is Rin Tin Tin?

Which one is Rin Tin Tin?

Patti says, “We added one more dog. They were not so easy to paint after they are already made!  The only thing I haven’t found is a small pipe for my tin man.”

A closer look at her hair

A closer look at her hair

Patti tells us, “Here you can see how the hair is attached to head.  The hair is curled heavy wire attached to holes drilled in top of the head large coffee can. The eyes and nose are made of bottle caps placed in different directions. The mouth is a piece of wire shaped in a smile.”

Tips:

After you collect your cans,

  • Remove labels. You can paint over any glue.
  • Pre-cut wire and punch holes in the smaller cans with an icepick.
  • Use wire or screws to attach the cans together.
  • For the eyes, drill two holes and attach bottle caps with screws and bolts
Hello!

Hello!

 

Little dog, with tin cut outs for 'ears'

Little dog, with tin cut outs for ‘ears’

 How to:  Body construction

The tin ‘people’ are constructed from cans, twisted wire, bottle caps and screws!  Rebar is driven into the ground to hold them up and paint to decorate them are the only other things you’ll need.

Tin lady wiring detail

Tin lady wiring detail

“This is how the arms and bosoms are attached.  They are wired to the upper body.”

 

Tin lady's skirt construction

Tin lady’s skirt construction

“This is a front view of the skirt.  It’s attached with screws and the buttons are bottle caps attached with screws.”

Tin Lady back side, secured to a stake and rebar

Tin Lady back side, secured to a stake and rebar

“The skirt is a coffee can split and wrapped around. This is the back side and it is attached to the body with screws.  You can also see that there is a wooden stake attached with screws.  However, it didn’t hold her up right so I had to brace the whole structure with some rebar.”  Patti added all these refinements after her ‘lady’ was already in place, so it was a challenge she says!

The feet sit in Patti's old shoes

The feet sit in Patti’s old shoes

“This is a picture of the leg and foot.  She has on a pair of my old sneakers which the legs just sit in.”

Tin man, head, neck and arms detail

Tin man, head, neck and arms detail

 

Back of tin man detail

Back of tin man detail

The tin man not only plows, but the plow helps to stabilize him. “This is my tin man and two dogs plowing. The man has rebar to help hold him up.  He actually stands without the rebar but he moves around too much, so the rebar keeps him standing in one place. This shows the tin man from the back to see how he is wired.”

Which one is Rin Tin Tin?

Which one is Rin Tin Tin?

The dogs, painted black and brown, have eyes and noses are made from bottle caps and their tongues   Their tongues are leather pieces painted red.

“After we made these, my Dad took home another set of cans and started making his own.  It was fun watching the different ways he wanted to create his tin people and dogs.  My ‘people’ are so much more fun painted.  People notice them more!”

 

Nell’s tin man to make

Nell's finished tin man, ready for the garden

Nell’s finished tin man, ready for the garden

Nell Stelzer says, “This is the finished project hanging inside. I wanted it to rust and thought it should since some of the cans I had saved were starting to show rust. ”

Nell Stelzer's materials

Nell Stelzer’s materials

“Last January, my challenge was to make a tin can man. These are the supplies I used,” Nell says.

Nell’s tips:

  • I used wire at first but the pieces did not hang right.
  • I punched holes with an awl and used screws and nuts.
  • His funnel cap is wired in so it can hang on the small shepherd’s hook.
"Rusty," in the garden

“Rusty,” in the garden

“I glued buttons on for the mouth.  I added a button mouth and a ceramic heart that I was gifted last year and had not used yet. I could not find a funnel at the thrift stores so this one came from a kitchen department.”  Nell tells us, “My Tin man is rusting well except for his hat which is aluminum. He seems to be guarding the hosta!”

 

 Two more tin men

Nadine Gurto's tin man with a heart

Nadine Gurto’s tin man with a heart

 

Dreama Bender's version of a tin man....easy

Dreama Bender’s version of a tin man….easy

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Bogdan's garden art

Bogdan’s unique garden art

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Take a look at an amazing imagination at work

Bogdan Dabrowski‎ may have a full time career, but he’s an artist at heart, making garden creations from recycled objects in his workshop. Look carefully. You’ll never believe some of the things he transforms into art!

Making use of scrap metal, hardware pieces and wood scraps and slices can be relaxing and creative, you’ll see and add some art accents to the garden.  All it takes is a certain amount of what we call ‘art supplies,’ som crafting skills and an imagination!

Bogdan's framed birds are inspired by a song

Bogdan’s framed birds are inspired by a song

Bogdan explains, “My enthusiasm for making garden art emerged suddenly which actually surprised me. Some two years ago, I got interested in antiques, started visiting local flea markets and made some interior renovations myself. Perhaps I was under an influence of TV shows such as American Picker and American Restoration, perhaps some subconscious childhood memories surfaced at that time. I built a garden workbench and did a major cleanup in my shed. It appeared I had so much small junk that I decided to do some repurposing.”

Birds on a wire

Bogdan's garden art

Bogdan tells us,”This is garden table legs, an old hose and some plywood. And the arrangement of the notes are explained here, in a child’s folksong.

Guess what makes up this garden art?

Guess what makes up this garden art? It’s an old grill top, embellished with wood slices, hung on a piece of hosing.

 

Bogdan's wooden totem, wood blocks, rings and a finial top

“My first garden totem made of pine half logs and curtain rings”

Bogdan has been posting his artwork on our FMG Facebook page for a few months and each one delighted us more! Now see more of his garden and artworks.

 

Enter....

Enter….

 

Clever table and chairs...look closely

Clever table and chairs…look closely

“This  is a garden table and stools made of oak logs, an old pastry board and decorated with old watches and upholstery nails.”

Several of Bogdan’s works are plaques to be hung on the garden fence.  He finds a unique ‘background’ then adds an assemblage of objects to it.  The result is nothing like you’d expect!

Old grill base and a shrub root painted white.

Old grill base and a shrub root painted white.

Bogdan tells us, “I’ve been gardening together with my wife, Dorota, for last fourteen years. It is Dorota who makes decisions about plants and replanting. We did not make any garden plan. It evolved together with us and our interests. The garden is a quarter of an acre in size, suburban and recreational in its character but still has a lot of wildlife.”

 

Bogdan and Dorota's garden

Bogdan and Dorota’s garden

 

A joyful owl of metal scrap

A joyful owl of metal scrap

 

Wood slice birdhouse

Wood slice birdhouse

Bogdan has embellished some of his birdhouses adding his own spin, like this one, decorated with slices of a wooden branch. He says, “I buy birdhouses, but then I decorate them. I threw out some old ones but then changed my mind, repaired them and put on some rustic decor.”

Coin covered birdhouse

Coin covered birdhouse

 

A unique and natural finish to the tool shed, from wood slices, a recurring technique he uses.

A unique and natural finish to the tool shed, from wood slices

“Garden tool shelter work-in-progress.” Cutting wooden discs (3/4 inch thick) to be glued to the wall or to other objects is a recurring technique he uses.

 

Surprising objects decorate the shed

Surprising objects decorate the shed

“These are actually fancy rubber doormats. They did not do very well at doors. They perform much better on the woodshed wall. The ‘stems’ are made of birch,” Bogdan says.

 

Entrance to Bogdan's 'mancave'

Entrance to Bogdan’s ‘mancave’  decorated with clocks and dials.

“My ‘Man Cave’ is a place where I do all my smaller, portable projects. I do also some small architecture in the garden, recently a bench and pathways.”

 

Balanced bench

Balanced bench

 

The workshop

The workshop

 

Low Key Arts

Some of Bogdan’s art is so subtle that the cleverness sneaks up on you. Surprising!

Lock up

Lock up

“Small collection of padlocks, shackles, hooks and presses on old cat’s enclosure. Will hang more of them.”

 

Cat and mouse?

Cat and mouse?

“The ‘catty’ garden faucet demanded a companion. Made it of watch parts.”

 

Garden table top and hose, attached with screws

Garden table top and hose, attached with screws

 

Steampunk candle holder

Steampunk candle holder

A broken turbo turned into a steampunk garden candlestick. It can be a stand or a wall hanger. It’s very heavy though.

 

Unique door handle

Unique door handle

“This weekend’s $5 purchase at Flea Market. A brass handle now fixed to the gate. Dorota’s idea.”

What is Bogdan working on now?

Guy Fawkes peers out through the trees

Guy Fawkes peers out through the trees

“This is a picture of my project in progress. It will be sort of a garden box.  The decoration, a Guy Fawkes mask, shows a lot about my and Dorota’s philosophy: gardening is an expression of our freedom: sort of “Do not tread on our garden!”

 

Guy Fawkes is a famed rebel in English history and in recent years has become a hero to modern activists in politics and a symbol of personal and political freedom.

 

Bogdan says,”We live in the suburbs of Warsaw, Poland. I am active professionally so I do the garden art at my leisure during weekends and holidays.”

On the back of the sat antenna. Made of watch parts.

On the back of the sat antenna. Made of watch parts

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Carlene's organized clutter

Carlene’s good garden clutter

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Carlene collects clutter!

Good clutter… The way Carlene Blair arranges this clutter is her talent and also the name of the  blog story, Organized Clutter, of her garden and home creations.   Junk gardening is one of the topics on her blog along with interior decorating, crafting and treasure hunting, all of our favorite things!

Many of her garden projects are so refreshingly unique that I know her imagination is boundless. Take a walk with us around her Northern Minnesota garden and see which projects and garden beds will inspire you.

Carlene's garden sink is decorated for 4th of July

Carlene’s garden sink is decorated for 4th of July

”My name is Carlene and I am the mother of three grown children, grandmother of two, and work four days each week selling furniture. I live in northern Minnesota, and chronicle my collecting, and decorating with vintage items in my home and gardens on my blog Organized Clutter. Although I have been a flower gardener for over twenty years, I didn’t become a junk gardener until the late 1990′s when I was inspired by Mary Randoph Carter’s book “Garden Junk.”

Above is Carlene’s potting sink, complete with a dish rack with blue and white plates.  A vintage pump and teapot sit on top along with red geraniums and small American flags.

 

Ironing board vignette includes a vintage iron, a tiny dress and a fresh pot of flowers

Ironing board vignette includes a vintage iron, a tiny dress and a fresh pot of flowers

My favorite junk garden pieces are vintage, rusty farm tools, and also vintage kitchen items that are readily available and inexpensive at thrift shops.”

Carlene's brilliant idea to 'frame' a hanging basket

Carlene’s brilliant idea to ‘frame’ a hanging basket

“My most popular garden project began as a square rustic picture frame, a galvanized bucket (that originally contained a citronella candle), and a techno-heat lobelia.  I hung the framed lobelia from a limb on my birch tree.”

 

Flower beds go vertical in Carlene's front garden

Flower beds go vertical with a step stool and ladder

“My front yard border, a mix of perennials, annuals, and junk, is a favorite of my neighbors.  The stepladder has been my garden signature piece for over 10 years while other plants and junk have come and gone.”  Carlene remarked.

 

Pump vignette "I like old pumps too and gas nozzles!" Carlene says

Pump vignette “I like old pumps too and gas nozzles!” Carlene says

 

Sweet container trio

Sweet container trio,…mushrooms made in small Jell-O molds

“I love using unusual repurposed items as planters, like this vintage ice cream freezer, and I like making garden decor from junk too.  The toadstools were made from individual Jello molds and screwdrivers.”

 

Hens and chicks get toasted

Hens and chicks get toasted

Carlene says, “”I challenge myself every garden season to find a new way to plant Sempervivum or hen and chicks.  Here I planted them in a vintage toaster.”

Toy tractor pushes a load of gravel in a succulent bed.

Toy tractor pushes a load of gravel in a succulent bed

“I added a toy Tonka front end loader to my succulent garden last year along with a dollar store river rock path.” she said.

 

Burlap covered patio chairs

Burlap covered patio chairs

Carlene says, “My stoneware bean pots with begonias and impatiens on top of another large crock. I did a graphics fairy transfer of French Roosters onto freezer paper ironed to muslin. The chair cushions are my old ones that I wrapped (like a present) with burlap!”

 

Carlene Blair's chippy red funnel echoes a colorful red lantana

Carlene’s chippy red funnel echoes a colorful red lantana

Just combining two ordinary things can create so much charm. She says,  “Here’s my upside down galvanized funnel with red stripe and a broken broom handle.”

Carlene created this terracotta and succulent miniature garden

Carlene created this terracotta and succulent miniature garden

 

A harvest season chair planter mixes orange and cool blue.

A harvest season chair planter mixes orange mums and a cool blue background

 

Carlene's uses vibrant color in her front flower bed

Carlene’s uses vibrant color in her front flower bed

Carlene’s front border has low plants in front and taller ones in back to show off all the primary colors.  “Since I garden in northern Minnesota in a hard Zone 3 climate, my front border is just starting to fill in, but in July, I think it will be beautiful!”  she tells us.

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Fabulous frames

Your picture framed garden!

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Amazing uses for old picture frames in the garden

Old frames are the easiest things to find at a thrift store or at Flea Markets , but did you know you can bring them into the garden in dozens of different ways? You’ll see frames that act as plant hangers, frames that add color to a fence and frames that ‘frame’ the view in you garden.  Can you be as creative as these Flea Market gardeners?

19 fun projects, from simple to sensational..

Deborah Sullivan's large red frame simply 'frames' her garden

Deborah Sullivan’s large red frame simply ‘frames’ her garden

Deborah Sullivan says over sized frames are fun in the garden! This one is brightly painted red and hung on a wire fence arbor.

 

Linda Cahill's rustic metal frame

Linda Cahill’s rustic metal frame

 

Linda Gladman's frame adds height to garden flower bed

Linda Gladman’s frame adds height to garden flower bed

Linda Gladman says, “This is my little “Oh Canada” garden … I made the butterfly out of beads and old chair spindle, hubs made the easel from our reclaimed wood pile, the totem I made a few years ago and the plate flower I just “planted.”  The butterfly was so much fun I made another six in various colours. The sunflower, like most in my yard, are compliments of the birds …”

 

Bogdan Dabrowski‎  "A piece of garden framed composition."

Bogdan Dabrowski‎ “A piece of garden framed composition.”

 

Bogdan's birds are inspired by a song

Bogdan’s birds are inspired by a song

Bogdan Dabrowski‎ created this simple frame from garden table legs, he says, old hose and some plywood. And the placement of the notes are based on the musical notes of a a popular Polish children’s song and are explained here

 

Kathy Schumacher‎'s amazing succulent frame

Kathy Schumacher‎’s amazing succulent frame

Kathy Schumacher‎ tells us, “My first try at planting a picture frame with succulents.”  We’re impressed! Paint the frame with a sealant to repel water for this project. You’ll need a frame, a shallow wooden ‘shadow box’, moss and a rectangle piece of chicken wire cut to fit.  Kathy added soil then the moss and poked the succulents through the wire ‘screen.’

Here are some instructions, if you’d like to try this!

 

Lynn Holland‎’s thrift shop find

Lynn Holland‎’s thrift shop find

Lynn Holland‎’s thrift shop find, a framed and etched mirror and just the spot to reflect her garden.

 

Carlene's brilliant idea to 'frame' a hanging plant, was a hit on her garden blog. Look for more on FMG from Carlene soon...

Carlene Blair’s brilliant idea to ‘frame’ a hanging plant, was a hit on her garden blog. Look for more on FMG from Carlene soon…

 

Finding frames

Unique and unused picture frames are easy to find,…once someone discards one, they put little value on them, so they are inexpensive as well.  Looks for the interestingly carved ones or metal frames that will hold up to the weather and can be painted with no qualms.  Frames can simply be made, too, from wood or twigs or who knows what!?

Collect several frames and arrange them on a fence or wall.  Positioned in front of the garden, as a “view finder” we can  look through a frame from different angles, creating different garden “paintings” in our imaginations.   It can also free, and it’s a good way to repurpose old picture frames in a surprising way.

Lynda Jalovec brightens her fence with frames and personal treasures

Lynda Jalovec brightens her fence with colorful picture frames

Lynda Jalovec tells us, “This is one of our little gardens we have in our back yard.  I love the idea I saw here of the crosses on the fence posts so I did that but added the picture frames for more color.  That ‘trellis’ is a rusty headboard that someone was throwing away and my husband saw it. He knew I would love to have it and he was right!”

 

Jeanie Merritt's welcoming chalkboard frame is the finishing touch to this scene.

Jeanie Merritt’s welcoming chalkboard frame is the finishing touch to this scene

Jeanie Merritt tells us, “Beautiful and full, this basket of million bells, (Calibrachoa) sits proudly in this blue chair with a message of “Welcome” to my visitors”  A simple project for everyone!

 

Sue Gerdes used three old picture frames to  display old tools.  Art!

Sue Gerdes used three old picture frames to display old tools. Art!

 

Marge Yetzke created what she calls her secret garden of personal treasures

Marge Yetzke created what she calls her secret garden of personal treasures

 

Karen Wilson says, " My friend and I both made these last year. They are quite unique. Clearly I don't like using regular pots in my yard!"

Karen Wilson says, ” My friend and I both made these last year. They are quite unique. Clearly I don’t like using ‘regular’ pots in my yard!”

 

Karen Wilson Love these cute little flowers!

Another framed planter by Karen Wilson. “Love these cute little flowers!”

 

Brian Stephan's framed garden tool set

Brian Stephan’s framed garden tool set

Brian Stephan says, I finally figured out how I wanted to display the last batch of vintage garden tools I bought. I used an old frame, rusted wire fabric and fishing line to tie them to the fabric.

 

Another rustic assemblage from Brian Stephan’s garden

Another rustic assemblage from Brian Stephan’s garden

 

Edie Kennedy's reverent frame

Edie Kennedy’s reverent frame

Edie Kennedy says, “This is St. Francis in my garden. He needed a church window, so I made him one out of a mirror that I got at the ‘ReStore.’ I put a stained glass decal on the mirror and even cut out some of the decal for the mirror to show through. The morning light out of the East highlights it beautifully.”

 

Jeanne Sammons found this 'art' easel at a craft show and had to have it.

Jeanne Sammons found this ‘art’ easel at a craft show and had to have it. Her hubby made the old barnwood frame on it

Jeanne Sammons’s easel style frame is made of branches and twigs and frames whichever section of her garden she likes at the moment.  Jeanne says, “This is what I call ‘Live Art’ here in my gardens…made by an artist at Farmer’s Market for me a couple yrs ago……I move it around as I like and I love it!”

Jeanne Sammons saw this framed 'living art' on a garden walk

Jeanne Sammons saw this framed ‘living art’ on a garden walk

“This is more ‘framed living art’ found on a garden walk a couple weeks ago and I think it’s very do-able!  Isn’t this gorgeous! I have my frame already! I found some instructions online, Jeanne says.”

 

 

Ann Elias‎ uses small frames to create her 'garden' sign

Ann Elias‎ uses small frames to create her ‘garden’ sign

Ann Elias‎ tells us, “I have been saving this board for 4 years already. It was in my Mother-in-laws garage when we were cleaning it out for the estate sale. I knew I could find something to do with it. Then I found these little frames,  lettering was already on the glass, at a thrift store for $2.00 and I knew right away..perfect for that old board I have been saving. And it hangs right below the wreath I made from her old hose and garden tools. ”

Ann Elias,”Mirror mirror on the fence...”

Ann Elias,”Mirror mirror on the fence…”

Mirrors work nicely in gardens especially when you are looking to create a sense of space and to reflect more of the garden, like Ann has.

Ann Elias's mirrored fence

Ann Elias’s mirrored fence

Ann multiplies this effect with this series of inexpensive plastic mirrors, all painted in her signature aqua color, create rhythm along her garden fence.

 

Sue Neitzel's framed signboard

Sue Neitzel’s sensational framed signboard

Sue Neitzel says, “How about a chalkboard by the back door to greet your guests? This used to be a park sign, it was left here when we bought the place, so I painted it with chalkboard paint. I love that stuff!”

What will you frame in the garden?

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